If you are auditioning for one of the older roles, Scrooge/Marley/Spirit/Solicitor, please use one of these monologues.

 

In this monologue, the Spirit of Christmas past has taken Scrooge to when he was a boy.  One Christmas he was left there alone – he “sees” his friends that were there with him – characters from Arabian Nights that he had been reading – he also weaves in reality with the vision of Valentine and Orson, two boyhood friends.

 

Scrooge: Why, it’s Ali Baba!  It’s dear old honest Ali Baba!  Yes, yes, I know!  One Christmas time, when yonder solitary child was left here all alone, he did come, for the first time, just like that.  Poor Boy!  And Valentine and his wild brother, Orson; there they go!  And what’s his name, who was put down in his drawers, asleep, at the Gate of Damascus; don’t you see him!  And the Sultan’s Groom turned upside down by the Genii; there he is upon his head!  Serve him right.  I’m glad of it.  What business had he to be married to the Princess!

There’s the Parrot!  Green body and yellow tail, with a thing like a lettuce growing out of the top of his head; there he is!  Poor Robin Crusoe, he called him, when he came home again after sailing round the island.  “Poor Robin Crusoe where have you been, Robin Crusoe?  The man thought he was dreaming, but he wasn’t.  It was the Parrot, you know. There goes Friday, running for his life to the little creek!  Halloa!  Hoop! Halloo! 

Poor boy! 

I wish --- but it is too late now.

[Spirit:  What is the matter?]

There was a boy singing a Christmas Carol at my door last night.  I should like to have given him something:  that’s all.

In the following monologue, Marley, Scrooge’s old partner who has died sometime ago, comes to Scrooge as a spirit to warn him to stop his bitter, greedy ways or he will end up like him, a spirit who wears the chains of what he was so tied to in life.

 

 

Marley:  Do you believe in me or not?  Spirits who do not walk with their fellow men in life are condemned to do so after death.  I am condemned to wander through the world and witness what I cannot share, but might have shared on earth and turned to happiness.  I wear the chain I forged in life.  I made it link by link and yard by yard of my own free will and of my own free will, I wore it.  Do you know the chains you wear yourself?  Yours are as heavy and long as this and you have worn them since seven Christmas Eves ago.   I have no comfort to give.  I cannot linger.  Weary journeys lie before me.  In my life, my spirit never walked beyond our counting-house and our money changing hole.  I have wandered these seven years with the incessant torture of remorse.  At this time of year I suffer the most.  Why did I walk through crowds of fellow-beings with my eyes turned down and never show an ounce of human kindness.  Marley turns to Scrooge with a warning look.  Hear me!  My time is nearly gone.  I am here tonight to warn you that you still have a chance and hope of escaping my fate. You will be visited by three spirits.  Without their visits you cannot hope to avoid the path I took.  Expect the first tomorrow when the bell tolls One.

If you are auditioning for one of the older roles, Scrooge/Marley/Spirits, please use one of these monologues.

 

The Spirit of Christmas past has taken Scrooge to when he was a boy.  One Christmas he was left there alone – he “sees” his friends that were there with him – characters from Arabian Nights that he had been reading – he also weaves in reality with the vision of Valentine and Orson, two boyhood friends.

 

Scrooge: Why, it’s Ali Baba!  It’s dear old honest Ali Baba!  Yes, yes, I know!  One Christmas time, when yonder solitary child was left here all alone, he did come, for the first time, just like that.  Poor Boy!  And Valentine and his wild brother, Orson; there they go!  And what’s his name, who was put down in his drawers, asleep, at the Gate of Damascus; don’t you see him!  And the Sultan’s Groom turned upside down by the Genii; there he is upon his head!  Serve him right.  I’m glad of it.  What business had he to be married to the Princess!

There’s the Parrot!  Green body and yellow tail, with a thing like a lettuce growing out of the top of his head; there he is!  Poor Robin Crusoe, he called him, when he camehome again after sailing round the island.  “Poor Robin Crusoe where have you been, Robin Crusoe?  The man thought he was dreaming, but he wasn’t.  It was the Parrot, you know. There goes Friday, running for his life to the little creek!  Halloa!  Hoop! Halloo! 

Poor boy! 

I wish --- but it is too late now.

[Spirit:  What is the matter?]

There was a boy singing a Christmas Carol at my door last night.  I should like to have given him something:  that’s all.

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